Damage Awards for Virginia PTSD Claims

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Workers’ compensation funds may be available to aid those who have developed PTSD as a result of a stressful occurrence at work.

Worker’s compensation for post-traumatic stress disorder in the Commonwealth of Virginia is not easy to get due to the state’s strict regulations. What you need to know before submitting a claim

  • Within 30 days after the injury, you should inform your employer.
  • There is a two-year deadline for filing a claim with the Virginia Workers’ Compensation Commission following an injury.
  • All medical care should be documented.
  • Many claims for workers’ compensation related to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are wrongfully dismissed. If your initial claim for workers’ compensation was denied, hiring an experienced lawyer to handle the appeal process is crucial. Reach out to us for a free evaluation of your PTSD claim to find out more about how we can assist you.

Richmond workers’ compensation lawyer can assist in investigating potential sources of evidence.

In what ways may I demonstrate the severity of my post-traumatic stress disorder in order to receive workers’ compensation?

Insurance companies may attempt to avoid paying benefits by arguing that your PTSD was caused by factors beyond their control, such as family tension, financial difficulties, or exposure to a traumatic event. Your claim will have more weight if you can show that your PTSD was directly caused by an incident or series of incidents on the job. For example, here are some scenarios that could occur:

If you’ve had a traumatic brain injury on the job, you may be suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). After physically healing from the injuries sustained in a car accident, heavy machinery accident, or workplace violence, a person may nevertheless suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Experiencing a traumatic occurrence at work might lead to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), even if no physical harm came to you.

In this case, the onset of PTSD was gradual and was caused by a series of terrifying incidents at work. Many occupations put workers in danger on a regular basis. Workers in the public safety sector (police officers, firefighters, EMTs, etc.) may be exposed to traumatic incidents on a regular basis. These traumatic experiences can cause long-term mental health problems, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).